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20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 16
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
just that. share prices in italy have fallen sharply as investors reacted to in the news that mario monti intends to resign. berlusconi hopes to stage a comeback. >> stormy political weather ahead for italy. suddenly, mario monti is on the way out. there will be early elections and berlusconi is reaching for power again. on the markets, there is deep unease. they're like the austerity measures and the reforms of the technocrats, mr. monti. they fear the return of politics as usual in italy. even if berlusconi is far behind in the polls, the very idea his attempt at come back has jangled nerves. >> the markets are shocked at the prospect that berlusconi would become prime minister again. he is responsible for the crisis in italy. he should enjoy his pension. the reforms have to go on. >> in this from the marketplace, there is not much enthusiasm for a return of mr. berlusconi. >> we italians need to worry, not because of the current crisis. more because this idiot berlusconi is around. i hope it's a good smashed in the face. -- i hope he gets a good smash in the face. >> but berlusco
midnight in italy, but because of the pope's health and to give him time to rest before he delivers the christmas day message, this year, the ceremony began at 9:00 gmt, and that would be 10:00 in italy, which was just about one hour ago. the pope conducting this mess and also lighting the candle of peace, which he did earlier and put on the balcony of his apartment window, which overlooks st. peter's square. this is one of the largest churches anywhere in the world. there are tourists and dignitaries and obviously lots of clergy as well. just to say that it is midnight mass even though is not midnight, but this will give the pope's some time to rest before he gives the christmas day speech from the balcony. let's have a look at some other news. a gun attack in the united states which has left others grieving, and two firefighters were killed as they responded to a blaze in upstate new york. the governor of new york state has called what happened in at the small town a senseless act of violence. it comes just 10 days after a shooting killed 26 people at a connecticut primary school.
compared it to lead to saudi arabia or egypt before the arab spring -- italy to sell the radio or egypt before the arab spring, it is good in the long run to mitigate the black swan risk. tavis: what might he have done differently? >> if you were self-employed, he would've had skills to fix the market. he had one employer dependent on bad employer, permitted his position and now he does not have any skills. he could have done differently if he had changed jobs or changed skills. it is overall like a system -- small corporations have more variations and they're forced to adapt a faster. tavis: if you are watching this program right now and you are listening to this example and you are closer to the 53-year- old scenario than you are to the taxi driver, what is the professor's advice to that person before they get to the point where they get laid off and they're 53 and cannot find a job right away? >> never think that lack of variability is stability. do not confuse lack of volatility with stability ever. tavis: y the think most of us do that? are we condition that way -- why do you think
fired tear gas and cordoned off the area. italy's prime minister has resigned, meaning the country will go to the polls in february. mario monti's unelected government loses support from the population. he said he could no longer govern. 3 million were left in dire need of help, but the military government responded by blocking visas to international aid workers and a resting burmese activists who tried to deliver assistance. many towns and villages were left to their own devices to rebuild. our correspondent has recently visited some of those areas and has filed this report. >> a buddhist ceremony led by children, one of the larger townships in the delta. this is still a poignant sight for the people of the town. the 10,000 who died here, nearly half were children. outside the town, the rice harvest has been taken in. the delta has historically been seen as the rice bowl not just for burma but the surrounding countries, too. chronic neglect, though, by successive military governments and then the cyclone have left this region in dire need. >> looks can be deceiving in the delta. e
school of notre dame was influential. we know it innewsed music across europe, spain and italy. >> but you have no idea how delighted quazi moto was. the bell told to mark the hours of the day as it told to mark the liberation of the city in 1944. >> in front of notre dame and even in one of the towers of the famous cathedral, the nazis have established fire. >> we traveled west of paris to normandy to this village, to one of three bell foundrys still in operation. here they are casting the eight new bells to hang in the to your. >> the original bells were seized during the revolution and melted to cannon balls. they are recasting them in copper and continue using molds fashioned from horse hair and ma nuria. >> as we don't want them to make them twice, we will make them higher in tune. and we will take the met a aloff inside to get it perfectly calibrated. >> once tuned, they will toll for the first time in march on palm sunday. right now it is the christmas nativity scene that draws the crowds with two million people expected in december. always an attraction. though it's the
't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had completely different ideas. >> there was no one that could have made a difference? >> no, because we mentioned before this dictator, you know, in a very delicate way. but mussolini, one time said speaking about italy, the italians said one phrase that is memorable. one phrase was interesting. they said to control it, to govern the italians is not difficult. it is imposs
is the major destination: germany, upwards of $80,000; $40,000, $50,000 in the netherlands, spain and italy and turkey. all of these countries are getting trafficked women. we have laws in every country on the planet that say you can't abduct people, you can't kidnap, you can't force them into prostitution, you can't assault them. the laws are there, but they're not being enforced. >> narrator: a day has passed and viorel still hasn't heard from maria or apo. >> no answer? >> nobody answering. >> narrator: most trafficking victims have no way out. a few escape, and some are let go when they're of no more value. but many get caught up in police raids like this one in antalya. what seems at first like a rescue will actually become the beginning of a new ordeal. >> when the cops find them, they deport them. the police just simply bring them to the immigration authorities, and they are deported. they're re-victimized yet again by the system. >> narrator: in most countries, trafficked women are treated as illegal immigrants with no access to the justice system, and the traffickers and pimps are
the message, and this programs of sistema happens in los angeles, in scotland, in sweden, in korea, in italy, in germany, not only los angeles in the states but it is happening in a lot of programs inspired by sistema, it is only to help that, you know, to develop the idea of music as a human right. >> rose: yes. >> it is a -- well, like this guy is talking about something really crazy. but i think art has to be an element of society, to be better citizens, to be a better human beings, we are not talking about something new. wwe can go back, you know, in times, you know, when art was an element, an essential element of the men. and that is something that we need in this -- >> rose: it speaks to who we are and what we want to become. >> exactly. especially in in very cultivated world where -- >> rose: yeah. >> where we have to build something better, something more sensible for -- >> rose: when you accepted the job at the la philharmonic, why there? >> one of my first commitments was at los angeles, after i won the competition,. i remember invited me. >> rose: the then conductor. >> exactly.
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-year-old lieutenant inowe way led an assault on machine guns in italy. he destroyed all three after being shot in the stomach and having his right arm nearly severed. it was later amputated. he was awarded the distinguished service cross but it was elevated to the medal of honor. his death live the michigan congressman as one of the two remaining world war ii veterans in congress. >> he worked to make the congress effective as a tool in serving the broad public interest both for hawaii and for the rest of the country. he believed in legislating, legislating well. he knew that working together and accepting the responsibilities that we get when we are sworn in and when weary lected was an extremely important part of his responsibility as senator. >> brown: after the war, he turned to politics. he won a seat in the u.s. house in 1959 and was elected senator in 1962. six years later as keynote speaker he lent a steady voice of reason to the riotous proceedings of the 1968 democratic convention in chicago. >> this is our country. and we are engaged in a time of great testing. >> brown:
to a countermovement of fast food. it started by out-of-work communists in italy the day they built a mcdonnel's on the spanish steps in rome. they came down to raise the flag against fast food. what it represents is that as we move forward into the future ideology becomes second to philosophy and food is produceed in a way that more represents getting it to the market in the right shape as opposed to celebrating the odd appletor very geospecific peach that grows in eastern washington. so they're trying to say don't let our biodiversity shrink to make it more efficient. let's keep biodiversity as an important thing and help promulgate and keep these things going by supporting them, creating a market for them and helping to get to the place. so that's what slow food is. >> the fact that you're no longer in the kitchen much, that you're an entrepreneur, does that mean the restaurant is not really yours anymore? >> no, as alain ducass once told me, "i 'nam all the kitchens all the time." ducasse. and he's got more than me. >> rose: this is a guy who survived a plane crash, by the way. >> i
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)